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Dear Abby: Truth of man's marital status revealed after his death
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Dear Abby

Dear Abby: Truth of man's marital status revealed after his death

DEAR ABBY: This is a delicate situation. Four days after my boyfriend (whom I had been seeing for 8 1/2 years) was killed in an accident, I found out he was married. He had claimed for years that he was divorced and even produced a copy of his divorce decree several years ago. It is a long story.

He has been dead for five months now, and I need something back from his wife that he borrowed from me: my father's Mason ring. I was devastated when I learned he was married and had lied to me all those years, but I have no intention of telling his wife or causing her pain. (I don't think she knows about me.) I would like the ring back because my father passed away many years ago, and I want to pass it on to my daughter, who never knew her grandfather. He died before she was born.

My boyfriend's sister (who lives with his wife) knows about me. She told me she won't tell her sister-in-law, and I should leave her alone. I'm not trying to hurt anyone because I wouldn't want anyone to do this to me if I was in her place, but I am lost about how to approach this. -- TWISTED SITUATION DOWN SOUTH

DEAR TWISTED SITUATION: I assume you have explained the situation to the wife's sister-in-law. Contact her once more and tell her you want the ring and need her help to get it back without starting WWIII. However, if she's still uncooperative, you may need a lawyer to write the grieving widow a registered letter explaining the entire situation and asking that the ring be returned. (I'm hoping there are identifying initials engraved inside that do not match her husband's.)

DEAR ABBY: I am 9 years old, and I have a twin brother. Sometimes he's nice to me and other times he's annoying. When he's annoying, sometimes he doesn't stop. Everywhere I go -- our car, the kitchen, table, everywhere -- I hear him babbling about nonsense. Even in my happy place (my bedroom). I wish I could lock my bedroom door, but my parents keep telling me not to lock ANY of the doors (except the car) in the house. Could you tell me what to do, please? I'd really like to stop being annoyed for once in my life. -- BOTHERED TWIN IN AUSTIN, TEXAS

DEAR TWIN: Is your brother TRYING to be annoying, or is he just ... annoying? If it's the former, talk to your parents about it because he may need to be put on notice. If it's the latter, then YOU should talk to him.

Explain that sometimes you don't feel like talking or playing and you need to be left alone. Agree on a signal -- like hanging a sock (or some other item) on the outside bedroom door knob so he'll know. And when you do, make sure you let him know you'll do the same for him when the situations are reversed, because they will be.

DEAR ABBY: Easter is a day to be thankful for Christ that our sins are forgiven. Opinionated atheists at the dinner table distract from the meaning of the celebration. Is it wrong on Easter Sunday to exclude relatives who no longer practice the Christian faith? -- SAVED IN MINNESOTA

DEAR SAVED: Before making up your mind, ask yourself, "What would Jesus do?"

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DEAR ABBY: There is a woman where I work who is emotionally needy. My work is autonomous, but we are in the same group, so I have to interact with her to some extent. Early on, I made the mistake of offering her emotional support, thinking she was going through something temporary and her life would get better. This is not the case. Her life is an anxiety-ridden train wreck. She doesn't think she needs to see a therapist, which, I guess, makes sense since I have been performing that role.

DEAR ABBY: I've been in a long-distance relationship for 2 1/2 years. We are now engaged, but haven't set a date for our wedding. We are both in the military, and we have maintained this relationship well. But there was a time before we dated that I was dating someone else. I ended that relationship, but haven't healed from it because I see him at work often, and I still have feelings for him.

DEAR ABBY: I am a 16-year-old girl, and I'm having a conflict with my mom over my car. Her car broke down and she needed to use mine, which is completely understandable, and I agreed. However, I have a work schedule I have to stick to, and I need my car to get to and from. I pay all the bills for it, and the title is in my grandfather's name.

DEAR ABBY: My husband's dad, "Adam," is very mellow and can talk to anyone. His mom, "Eve," is friendly, but a little more reserved. Early in their marriage, Adam was a drinker, and my mother-in-law has never forgiven him for the way he treated her during that time. She has always treated him disrespectfully, but as they get older, it's becoming worse.

DEAR ABBY: My tattoos are destroying my marriage, and I just don't understand why. I'm a 56-year-old elementary art teacher and the father of three grown children. Since I was young, I have loved the artistic expression of tattoos, and I ALWAYS envisioned having them, lots of them.

DEAR ABBY: My ex-husband was the product of an extramarital, interracial relationship. Both of the parents who raised him are white, and he has always denied he was biracial despite the obvious physical characteristics that say otherwise.

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