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RONA BARRETT: When it comes to voting — gray matters
RONA BARRETT’S GRAY MATTERS

RONA BARRETT: When it comes to voting — gray matters

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Rona Barrett's Gray Matters: 'Frustration always comes before achievement'

Rona Barrett

It shouldn’t amaze me, but it always does, when the light bulb goes off in my head and I say to myself, “I didn’t know that!” This happens more frequently than I care to admit.

It happened again while I was researching the words to tell you how deeply held my belief is that our votes count in this challenging and highly volatile election-cycle we currently find ourselves in.

First, I researched inspirational quotes including:

This right to vote is the basic right without which all others are meaningless. It gives people, people as individuals, control over their own destinies.

When we vote, we take back our power to choose, to speak up, and to stand with those who support us and each other.

If we don’t vote, we are ignoring history and giving away the future.

Personally, I think these wise words carry the most weight when we don’t know who said them. But if who said them carries the most weight for you, please Google the answer.

Here’s another:

Every election is determined by the people who show up.

My research made me realize that it’s seniors who have shown up the most. Not just recently, either. That’s what made the lightbulb go off.

Here’s what an AARP article at www.aarp.org had to say in their April 30, 2018 article, ‘The Immense Power of the Older Voter’: “For nearly 40 years, the turnout of voters over age 45 has significantly outpaced that of younger Americans.”

The article goes on to say: “While analysts point to increased energy among younger voters over the past couple of elections, people over 65 continue to show up at the polls far more than any other age group.

And here’s one reason why according to a veteran pollster in the article: “They are the only group that I believe looks out not only for their own well-being but the well-being of their children and grandchildren.”

But, the article cautions, “In today’s world, it’s really hard to be clear about where the candidates stand on the issues… it’s so chaotic. There’s so much news, so much fake news, that activism is really important.”

The article ends with these important words of wisdom: “When races are close, every vote and every voter matter…You’re not going to know whether the race will come down to a handful of votes until it’s too late to cast your vote. The best policy is just to vote.”

This voting year, my friends, we have many challenges and obstacles to overcome. But another article on the AARP website, ‘Will Older Voters Decide the 2020 Election’ says: “Not that many people need extra motivation to vote this November. “This is an extremely important election, and people on both sides have strong feelings … older voters are going to find a way to register their opinions, whether or not it's in person."

So, when you vote — in-person or by mail — as some wise person once said, “Vote the change you want to see in the world.”

In California, go to www.so.ca.gov/elections for more information. Or call 800-345-8683.

We must continue to show up. Doesn’t matter how we do it — we must show up. Because when it comes to voting — Seniors matter.

Until next time … keep thinking the good thoughts.

The Rona Barrett Foundation, a nonprofit organization, is the driving force behind the Golden Inn & Village (GIV). With their partner, the Housing Authority of Santa Barbara County, they offer the area’s first affordable senior living facility. GIV strives to bring services to seniors so they may age in place. Reach her at info@ronabarrettfoundation.org. Visit www.ronabarrettfoundation.org for more information.

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